Program Studi

Ekonomi Islam

Overview
Graduate Profile
Learning Outcome
Curriculum
Assessment Method
Lecturer

Head of Undergraduate Program in Islamic Economics

Dr. Sri Muljaningsih, S.E.,M.S.P

Brief Profile

Undergraduate Programme in Islamic Economics (PS EKIS) as a university, has a curriculum as a plan and arrangement regarding the objectives, content and teaching materials as well as the methods used as guidelines for organizing learning activities to achieve the goals of higher education. The curriculum as the direction and purpose of development has dynamics in an effort to achieve the expected goals. These dynamics are a consequence of the development of a society that can be accommodated.

Society is a dynamic institution. Dynamic occurs as a result of the growing demands of society and the need for a better life. Therefore, curriculum development is required to accommodate according to the times. For example, in the early decades of the 21st century there were several issues related to human resource development, including the following:

  1. Treatment of the Indonesian National Qualifications Framework (KKNI) and National Higher Education Standards.
  2. 2015 ASEAN Economic Community (ASEAN Economics Community 2015).
  3. Accommodating literacy development in accordance with Permendikbud No. 23 of 2015 concerning the growth of character
  4. Skills as required in the 21st century

In order to prepare graduates who are competent with the needs of the times, curriculum development for study Programmes is directed to answer emerging needs and challenges that student will face in the future. The rapid changes in social, cultural, world of work and information technology are some of the challenges that will be faced by all graduates. Therefore, in curriculum development, links and matches are needed, an innovative learning process is required to facilitate students in achieving optimal and relevant learning achievements.

  1. The curriculum of the PS EKIS in 2020 is a refinement of the curriculum from previous years. The curriculum contains a set of plans and arrangements regarding graduate learning outcomes, study materials, processes and assessments that are used as guidelines for the implementation of education in the Economics Study Programme. Curriculum Development refers to: Presidential Regulation of the Republic of Indonesia Number 8 of 2012 concerning the Indonesian National Qualifications Framework (KKNI).
  2. Ministry of Education and Culture Regulation Number 3 of 2020 concerning the National Standard for Higher Education (SN-DIKTI)
  3. Regulation of the Chancellor of the University of Brawijaya Number 34 of 2020 concerning the Curriculum of the Independent Study Programme Learning Independent Campus (MBKM).

Vision

“To become an international standard higher education institution that can develop concepts and applications of Islamic Economics”

Mission

  1. Organizing Islamic economic education with a critical, creative and innovative thinking approach.
  2. Conducting and publishing research and community service as well as other scientific activities for the development of applied economics in the field of Islamic economics.
  3. Inspiring, enlightening, and empowering civil society based on the results of education and research.

Program Educational Objectives

The objective of the Undergraduate Programme in Islamic Economics is to produce graduates who work as Research Assistants, Staff in Islamic Finance and ZISWAF, Analyst Assistants in Islamic Economics, and Young Entrepreneurs, with the following competencies (PEO):

PEO 1: Capable of mastering Islamic Economics theory and apply to solve economic problems using Islamic Economics principles

PEO 2: Capable of developing themselves in a sustainable manner through research and education in the field of economics.

PEO 3: Capable of communicating orally and in writing, professionally, with character and ethics in the field of Islamic Economics.

The following is the profile of graduates of the Islamic Economics Study Programme

Graduate Profile Profile Description

Research assistant

Assigned in terms of assisting researchers in conducting research, development, and assessment of science and technology in research organizations, development and assessment of government/private institutions.

Staff in Islamic Finance and ZISWAF

Served as staff in the field of Islamic finance, both banks and non-banks as well as ZISWAF institutions that play a role in supporting economic activities

Assistant Analyst in Islamic Economics

Serves as an assistant analyst and consultant in the field of Islamic Economics who is able to plan, analyse, and compile reports on business planning and/or research in the field of Islamic Economics

Young entrepreneurs

Tasked with creating business opportunities in the field of Islamic Economics in supporting economic acceleration

The learning outcomes of graduates (ILO) of the Undergraduate Programme in Islamic Economics include 4 competencies, namely attitudes, general skills, special skills, Mastery of Knowledge as follows:

ILO

PEO 1

PEO 2

PEO 3

ILO-1: Capable of internalizing professional academic values, norms, and ethics (S8)

   

v

ILO 2: Capable of demonstrating a responsible attitude towards work in the field of expertise independently (S9)

   

v

ILO 3: Capable of applying logical, critical, systematic, and innovative thinking in the context of developing or implementing science and technology that pays attention to and applies humanities values ​​(KU1)

 

v

 

ILO 4 : Capable of compiling a scientific description of the results of studies on the implications of the development or implementation of science and technology that pays attention to and applies the values ​​of the humanities in accordance with their field of expertise based on scientific principles, procedures and ethics in order to produce solutions, ideas, designs or art criticisms, compiling a scientific description of the results the study in the form of a thesis or final project report (KU3, KU 4)

 

v

 

ILO 5: Capable of generating appropriate decisions in the context of problem solving based on the results of information and data analysis (KU5)

 

v

 

ILO 6: Capable of demonstrating critical thinking in the fields of economics, finance and business that are in accordance with Islamic principles (KK1)

v

   

ILO 7: Capable of applying economic, financial, and business theory to analyse economic development issues and policies in order to solve economic problems at the regional, national, and global levels of Islamic Economics principles (KK6)

v

   

ILO 8: Capable of publishing and conducting research, analyse and interpret data with quantitative and qualitative approaches in the field of Islamic economics (KK3, KK7)

 

v

 

ILO 9: Capable of mastering the concepts and theories of Islamic economics (P1, P2, P3, P4)

v

   

ILO 10: Capable of mastering the theoretical concepts of muamalah law (P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, P10)

v

   

PS EKIS map out the compulsory and elective courses based on its ILOs, and they are systematically organized while taking into account the student’s learning load and the complexity and depth of the study material. In general, PS EKIS curriculum structures offer 168 credits, but the student can take at least 148 credits and a maximum of 160 credits to graduate. These credits are divided into seven subject groups: General/National Compulsory Courses (8 credits), University Compulsory Courses (14 credits), Faculty Compulsory Courses (18 credits), Department Compulsory Courses (36 credits), Compulsory Courses for Study Programs (36 credits), Compulsory Interest Courses (21 credits), and Elective Courses (15 credits). PS EKIS has accomodated MBKM curriculum by providing convertible course into MBKM activities approximately 20 credits. In any case, student participate in MBKM activities, the total credits students take until graduation is 149. Compulsory courses aim to develop graduates’ main competencies (approximately 88% of total credits) while elective courses aim to strengthen core competencies (approximately 12% of total credits).

Students are declared passed if they have taken a minimum of 149 credits with the following details:

  1. The number of credits for compulsory courses is 144 credits and a maximum of 160 credits
  2. The number of credits of elective courses available is 18 credits

The complete PS EKIS curriculum structure is depicted in the roadmap below:

The type of credit system applied in PS EKIS is the Semester Credit Unit (SKS). If the SKS system is converted to the ECTS system, the credits that must be taken by students of the PS EKIS without participate in MBKM activities are as follows:

  • Number of Credits for General/National Compulsory Courses (8 SKS) = 1.5x8SKS = 12 ECTS
  • Number of Credits for University Compulsory Courses (14 credits) = 1.5x14SKS = 21 ECTS
  • Number of Credits for Compulsory Faculty Courses (18 credits = 1.5×18 credits = 27 ECTS
  • Number of credits for Major Compulsory Courses (36 credits) = 1.5×36 credits = 54 ECTS
  • Number of SKS for Study Programme Compulsory Courses (57 SKS) = 1.5×57 SKS = 85,5 ECTS
  • Number of Credits for Elective Courses (15 SKS) = 1.5×15 SKS = 22.5 ECTS

Then the number of credits PS EKIS students must take until graduation is 222 ECTS. Meanwhile,  in case student takes MBKM for two semesters, the number of credit that PS EKIS students must take for graduation is 149 sks or equal to 223.5 ECTS

To see the curriculum structure in more detail, please access the following link:

Final – Curriculum Summary PS EKIS

1.Assessment of learning outcomes based on the grading system

The assessment procedure for PS EKIS in all courses (except KKN-P and Thesis) is based on the assessment procedure contained in the FEB UB manual. The assessment procedure uses a grading system based on an OBE-based curriculum which consists of two methods, namely the case method and team-based project. The following are the assessment components for the case method:

Components

Proportion

Participation

55%

Quiz

5%

Task

10%

Mid-Semester Exam (UTS)

15%

Final Semester Exam (UAS)

15%

Note: *) the proportion of the assessment components is adjusted to the learning outcomes and assessment methods in each study programme

Meanwhile, the assessment components for the team-based project can be seen in the following table.

Components

Proportion

Participation

25%

Quiz

10%

Project

35%

Mid-Semester Exam (UTS)

15%

Final Semester Exam (UAS)

15%

Based on the proportion of these value components, the absolute value calculation is as follows:

NA Case Method: 0,55 P + 0,5Q + 0,1 TS + 0,15 UTS + 0,15 UAS

NA Team Based Project: 0,25 P + 0,1Q + 0,35 HP + 0,15 UTS + 0,15 UAS

Absolute Score

Letter Score

Letter Grade Proportion

>80 – 100

A

4.0

>75 – 80

B+

3.5

>69 – 75

B

3.0

>60 – 69

C+

2.5

>55 – 60

C

2.0

>50 – 55

D+

1.5

>44 – 50

D

1.0

0 – 44

E

0.0

For KKN-P has its own assessment method. The final KKN-P score is a combination of the scores given by the KKN-P partners and also the KKN-P supervisor lecturers. The following are the assessment components for KKN-P partners and supervisors as follows:

KKN-P Partner Assessment

KKN-P Advisor

Assessment Component

Score Range

Assessment Component

Score Range

 

1.    Technical ability/assignment of KKN-P material

0-100

1.    Relevance area of ​​expertise

0-100

 

2.    Creativity

0-100

2.    Ability to explain (maintain)

0-100

 

3.    Leadership

0-100

3.    Level of difficulty

0-100

 

4.    Communication skills

0-100

4.    Report presentation

0-100

 

5.    Discipline

0-100

 

 

 

6.    Politeness

0-100

 

 

 

7.    Appearance

0-100

 

 

 

Average score of KKN-P partners

0-100

average score of the supervising lecturer

0-100

 

           

The seven aspects assessed by the KKN-P Partners were averaged, as were the four aspects assessed by the KKN-P supervisors. The average results of the KKN-P Partner scores and supervisors are added up and then averaged again to obtain the absolute final score. The provisions for the final grade of KKN-P in letters follow the same provisions as other courses

As for the thesis using a different assessment method. The thesis examination stages are divided into 2, namely the Proposal Seminar Examination and the Comprehensive Examination. The Proposal Seminar Exam has a weight of 33% and the Comprehensive Exam has a weight of 67% towards the final score of the Student Thesis. The provisions for the final value of the Thesis in letters follow the same provisions as other courses. For each exam has the same assessment components, namely:

Assessment Component

Proportion

Thesis Quality

50%

Mastery of Thesis & Theory Materials

30%

Presentation Quality

20%

Total score

100%

2.Assessment of ILO AchievementsThe following is the method of measuring or achieving ILO PS EKIS:

a)Develop linkages between CLO and ILO PS EKIS

b)Develop CLO weighting based on assessment components (participation, quizzes, assignments, UTS, UAS). The CLO weighting for each component of the course is arranged based on the relevance between the ILO/CLO and the assessment method which is distinguished based on the CLO aspect and the type of courses offered, as shown in the following table:

ILO/CLO Group

Nature of Courses

Assessment Method

Attitude

Theory & Applied Economics Course

Participation & Assignments

Knowledge

Theory & Applied Economics Course

Assignments, Quiz, UTS and UAS

Applied Skills/Analysis

Applied economics & analytical methods course

Participation and Assignments

c)ILO and CLO achievement standards

Score Range

Achievements

80

Excellent

65 score < 80

Good

50 score < 65

Fair

0 score < 50

Poor

No Position Name
1 Professor Prof. Dr. AGUS SUMAN, SE., DEA.
2 Professor Prof. AHMAD ERANI YUSTIKA, SE., M.Sc., Ph.D.
3 Professor Prof. Dr. CANDRA FAJRI ANANDA, S.E., M.Sc.
4 Professor Prof. DEVANTO SHASTA PRATOMO, S.E., M.Si., Ph.D.
5 Professor Prof. Dr. M. PUDJIHARDJO, S.E., M.S.
6 Professor Prof. Dr. M. UMAR BURHAN
7 Professor Prof. Dr. MUNAWAR, SE., DEA.
8 Associate Professor Dr. Dra. ASFI MANZILATI, ME.
9 Associate Professor DWI BUDI SANTOSO, SE., MS., Ph.D.
10 Associate Professor Dr. Drs. ISWAN NOOR, ME.
11 Associate Professor Dr. Dra. MULTIFIAH, MS.
12 Associate Professor Dr. Drs. SASONGKO, MS.
13 Associate Professor SETYO TRI WAHYUDI, SE., M.Ec., Ph.D.
14 Assistant Professor BAHTIAR FITANTO, SE., MT.
15 Assistant Professor EDDY SUPRAPTO, SE., ME.
16 Assistant Professor Dr.rer.pol. FERRY PRASETYIA, SE., M.App.Ec.
17 Assistant Professor Dra. MARLINA EKAWATY, M.Si., Ph.D.
18 Assistant Professor SHOFWAN, SE., M.Si.
19 Assistant Professor Dr.rer.pol. WILDAN SYAFITRI, SE., ME.
20 Lecturer AJENG KARTIKA GALUH, S.E., M.E.
21 Lecturer AMINNULLAH ACHMAD MUTTAQIN, M.Sc., Fin.
22 Lecturer ATU BAGUS WIGUNA, S.E., M.E.
23 Lecturer DWI RETNO WIDIYANTI, SE.I., M.Sc.
24 Lecturer FAISHAL FADLI, S.E., M.E., Ph.D.
25 Lecturer FARAH WULANDARI PANGESTUTY, S.E., M.E., Ph.D.
26 Lecturer IKA KHUSNIA ANGGRAINI, S.HI., M.H.I.
27 Lecturer LAILA MASRURO PIMADA, S.E., M.S.E.I.
28 Lecturer NUGROHO SURYO BINTORO, S.E., M.Ec.Dev., Ph.D.
29 Lecturer NURMAN SETIAWAN FADJAR, S.E., M.Sc.
30 Lecturer YENNY KORNITASARI, S.E., M.E.

 

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